ignore editors pitchesPhoto Credit: innovationinpractice.com

So around March this year, someone reached out to me. He’d like for me to produce some articles in a timely manner. The articles were voluminous too, so I concluded I’ll need some help.

I floated my intention on a particular forum and minutes later, I’d have more applications in my email than the available slots for only three freelance writers. Even months after I had turned in the assignments, my mailbox still played host to lots of emails.
One thing that amazed me, and that I feel will amaze those applicants even more, should they’re granted access to my email, was the number of emails I received in respect of a vacant slot for three freelance writers which my job description also helped to echo.
As I took the pain to reply to the several emails, letting them know I already screened and made my choice, I got a return message from one particular applicant whose message had all sorts of unprintable words. Actually, he went on accusing me why it took me that long to reply to his application. Now if I used all my time to return messages, how much time will I have left to do my client’s task?

Actually, he went on accusing me why it took me that long to reply to his application. Now if I used all my time to return messages, how much time will I have left to do my client’s task?
And who am I by the way? I guess one lucky freelance writer who got uncommonly lucky at the time. I was not a content writing services or website. I was not doing articles or guest blog; only a few applications that grew massive. Likewise, I was not an editor at Forbes or Entrepreneur.
The gist is, if I, who is not an editor at top publications like Fast Company, Inc.magazine could receive such volume of emails, start picturing the number of emails Peter Page of Entrepreneur.com will be receiving daily. And am reasonably sure that Peter, not once, not twice, would’ve received facsimile versions of such email messages. Sure he might just ignore them, but I am tempted to ask, has this ranting changed the fact that Peter is busy? Far busier than the person sending this pitch could imagine?

And am reasonably sure that Peter, not once, not twice, would’ve received facsimile versions of such email messages. Sure he might just ignore them, but I am tempted to ask, has this ranting changed the fact that Peter is busy? Far busier than the person sending this pitch could imagine?
The fact you woke up to a free day doesn’t necessarily mean everybody had that leisure. There are people who are working really hard and around the clock. They’ve their time all scheduled up for one thing or the other. And if I may add, they sure are entitled to some private time for their private life too. So, they don’t owe you their time.
If you don’t know already, well, editors reject pitches without a blink. This is another possibility about them which, if ignored, may be frustration at best or abandoned writing career at worst. I think you need come to terms with the fact that it’s your pitches that they’re rejecting, not you.

And it is true — editors will reject your pitches most of the time because they think your pitch idea does not resonate with their business or company’s ideals. If you’re lucky, you’ll get a return message consolidating this stated fact or similar others for being the reason(s) your pitch was rejected. But most of the time, you won’t receive any message at all.
What most smart people do is to send another pitch, this time letting your editor know you’re sending the pitch as a reminder. Chances are that your pitch got lost in the ocean of pitches. You might have used the contact form (which most publications always advise but I take hesitation).

Chances are likewise, that the editor even thinks he had replied to your pitch. But with a reminder pitch, your message could gain the top spot in your editor’s inbox so that it get to be read this time.
But need I let you know that I am not a fan of what I can term fruitless or unnecessary persistence. It’s a word I personally coined so don’t worry if you can’t find it in your dictionary. This is a situation when you’ll be advised to keep sending reminder pitches repeatedly although you aren’t getting any response from the editor.

Based on this I’ve four recommendations:
First, I’d like to state that some editors are unrealistically unreasonable with their expectations Click To Tweet. They forget too soon themselves will never have gotten to where they are today if they were not given a “chance.” If you notice this of an editor, use your discretion.
Second, and they (your editors) might be right, anyway. If any of your skills — language, editing, proofreading, etc. is not up to par — don’t feel bad. Just improve it. Most editors do not have that luxury of time to hand-hold.
Third, you could copy the pitch template of the publications where you have been accepted. You could let someone who’s better off in the use of the language help you proofread your pitch before you resend. For this one as well, with several resend and no reply, I’ll suggest you look elsewhere. You’re better off with your time doing something else than pitching a publication that may never reply.
Again, and just as I suggested in the paragraph preceding this one, move on, but with a promise that you’ll be coming back sometimes soon. While you go away, try to be featured on as many top publications as would accept you.

Ensure your articles on those platforms performed well: shares, likes, and comments. Then go back and pitch those publications you dumped earlier. Pitch them now with few of the links to your articles that did well on other platforms. I am about 70% sure you’ll get a return message this time. Although it might not be as soon as you expected (owing to some of the reasons I’ve stated above).

Up there are a lot of possibilities about your editors, which have you ignored?

 

Author: Sam

Sam is a freelance content writer. He blogs at 1stclasswriters.com where he shares his knowledge and experience about the freelance writing business. When Sam is not writing, he could be on his social channels chatting up like minds.

If you Ignore These Possibilities About Your Editors, They’ll Ignore Your Pitches

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